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(S) This course covers a wide range of topics necessary for all students in the field of Information Technology. It introduces the full implication of information systems, their types, and applications. Diffferent hardware and communication platforms are discussed. The course explores the internet and its applications. Integration of information technology, the operation of business organizations, and its impact on management, ethics, and decision making is presented. Prerequisite: COMP 241. (Odd Years Only).

Prerequisites: COMP241
Hours
3

(S) An in-depth study of data communiction and networking, including technologies, hardware, and software. Emphasis is upon the analysis and design of networking applications in organizations and the management of telecommunication networks. Prerequisites: COMP 312, 394. (Even Years Only).

Prerequisites: COMP312 and COMP394
Hours
3

(S) Information Security is one of the major concerns in today's global diital world. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of Information Security as a whole, its terminology and history. It presents a balanced introduction to both security management and the technical components of security from the perspective of Information Systems. Students will learn how to identify the needs and benefits of security, make informed decisions on selecting and developing strategies for managing information security plans at their work places. Prerequisites: COMP 305.

Hours
3

(F) This course examines the principles, techniques, and trends of contemporary operating systems such as Windows and Unix. The course will also explore the basic concepts of design and development of operating systems. Prerequisite: COMP 425. (Even Years Only).

Prerequisites: COMP312
Hours
3

(S) This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental concepts of relational databases and their applications. Students will learn about conceptualizing data using ERD, designing and normalizing tables, designing and running SQL scripts, DBMS and its components. The course will also highlight the O.O. databases as well. Prerequisites: COMP 250, COMP 394. (Even Years Only).

Prerequisites: COMP250
Hours
3

(S) A capstone course for the MIS track in the CIT Major. It will provide students with the in-depth knowledge and training required to analyze and design information systems in order to solve business problems. The course will dissect all the phases of the SDLC and will explore a range of methodologies used in analysis and design such as the O.O. Prerequisites: Senior status, COMP 305 and 440.

Prerequisites: COMP440 and COMP447
Hours
3

(on demand) Supervised practical field experience at an approved site in combination with an academic component to strengthen the student's theoretical background. In order to be considered for a placement, the student must have attained at least Junior status, completed 15 hours of Union College CIT courses, and the approval of the Department Chair. The course will be taken on a credit/fail basis only.

Hours
0

Professional Orientation is a theory and practice. Various aspects of the counseling profession are explored including the foundations of counseling; psychological theories; techniques and processes relevant to counseling; professional, ethical, and legal issues; and counseling practice. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to examine these areas of counseling and to introduce students to this profession. This course should serve as a foundation for other counseling courses.

Hours
3

A comprehensive review of fundamental concepts in personality theories and their applications to counseling and psychopathology, with special focus on explicating the relationship between theory and practice. Key elements and concepts: identifying the strengths and limitations of each of the major theories, as well as commonalities and divergences among them. The course will help students formulate an initial personal theory of counseling from which to build as they evolve through the program. Exploration of Psychoanalytic, Behavioral, Person Centered, Gestalt, Cognitive, and Perceptual-phenomenological theories are among the course foci. Cross-listed as PSYH 502.

Hours
3

Intensive focus on the development of individual counseling skills through readings, discussion, experiential exercises, and feedback on skill development. Reviews of videotaped interviews enhance self-observation skills and understanding of therapeutic process. Prerequisites: 502 & 520. Cross-listed as PSYH 503.

Hours
3

Major emphasis on factors determining the development of addictions, including physiological, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral dimensions of the addictive process. Also emphasizes intervention and treatment strategies for the various types of chemical dependency and substance abuse. Cross-listed as PSYH 510.

Hours
3

An intensive exploration of the current state of research and theory as applied to human development across the lifespan. Although this course outlines the latest findings on developmental changes that occur from birth to eighteen, strongest emphasis will be placed upon adult development and changes that are a product of the aging processes. Developmental issues germane to counseling and the helping professions will be emphasized, along with in-depth discussions of developmental research from primary source material. Cross-listed as PSYH 511.

Hours
3

This course involves an examination of current issues related to the classification and diagnosis of abnormal behavior and psychological states. Dimensional, descriptive, and categorical approaches to classification are reviewed, with emphasis on the current forms of adult psychopathology found in the DSM. Topics include the symptomatology, etiology, developmental patterns, and treatment approaches to various diagnostic categories. Empirical findings, methodological concerns, and conceptual issues are discussed. Cross-listed as PSYH 520.

Hours
3

This course involves an examination of issues related to measuring psychological states and outcomes relevant to counselors and psychological practitioners. Topics reviewed include Science and Pseudoscience, Treatment/Intervention Efficacy and Effectiveness (i.e., empirical validation), Impact of Training: Professionals vs. Paraprofessionals, Meta-Analytic Strategies, Case Studies or Experimental Comparisons, and Clinical Trials & Manualized Treatment.

Hours
3

This course introduces studies that provide an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation in a culturally diverse society. This course also provides an understanding of assessment in counseling through (1) an overview of basic counseling assessment concepts, (2) an understanding of test construction, (3) familiarity with instruments, and (4) an overview of test interpretation. It also provides a discussion of typical problems and approaches to individual and group testing in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest, and personality measurement. History, rationale, and ethical issues in the use of counseling assessment instruments are included.

Hours
3

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of career development as it impacts on individuals throughout the life span. Emphasis is placed on career and vocational choice theories, current approaches to career development planning and placement, and social and psychological factors in career decision-making. Formal and informal occupational classification systems are covered. A great deal of emphasis is placed on practical applications of career theory to school counseling, individual counseling, group guidance, job search and placement, and career adjustment.

Hours
3

This course examines theoretical approaches including major systems theories, strategies, and techniques of family and relationship therapy. A survey of the development of family and relationship counseling and proponents of the field are studied. Issues of conflict and ethical considerations are examined. The impact of cultural and social forces upon the family system is explored.

Hours
3

This course is a conceptual and experiential introduction to group dynamics, group counseling approaches and models, issues of group leadership, and group facilitation skills. Consideration is given to the goals of group counseling, composition, phases, and research. Includes group counselor orientations and behaviors, appropriate selection criteria and methods, and methods of evaluation of effectiveness.

Hours
3

This course provides the opportunity for counselors and clinicians to strengthen their multicultural awareness, knowledge, and skills in the competencies necessary to effectively evaluate and treat culturally and ethnically diverse clients. Students will be able to develop an awareness of the prevalent beliefs and attitudes of different cultures, and to develop skills useful for appropriate interactions with diverse individuals. In the course of these studies, it is hoped that students will also become more aware of their own cultural values and biases as they study prevalent beliefs and attitudes of different cultures and diverse groups. Formerly PSYH 655.

Hours
3

This course is a survey of the specific criteria required for proper diagnosing of mental disorders and proper treatment planning. Upon completion of the course, students will have the ability to make accurate provisional five axis diagnoses using DSM-IV-TR criteria and be competent in applying a variety of related treatment planning tasks such as case conceptualization, scope of practice, establishing viable, articulate treatment plans, and using treatment protocols. Cross-listed as PSYH 665.

Hours
3

This course is a survey of the specific criteria required for proper diagnosing of mental disorders and proper treatment planning. Upon completion of the course, students will have the ability to make accurate provisional five axis diagnoses using DSM-IV-TR criteria and be competent in applying a variety of related treatment planning tasks such as case conceptualization, scope of practice, establishing viable, articulate treatment plans, and using treatment protocols. Cross-listed as PSYH 665.

Hours
3

This course is designed to provide students with a supervised clinical practice experience and meet the requirements for licensure in the state of Kentucky. Prerequisites: Candidacy in the M.A. Psychology Program; PSYH 660 or an approved course in professional ethics; clinical assessment courses as required for the student’s program. Formerly PSYH 679. Cross-listed as PSYH 689.

Hours
3

This course requires completion of a supervised internship for students in the Counseling program. These courses are taken over two consecutive semesters, with two registrations (PSYH 690 and PSYH 691). These courses are intended to provide students with a comprehensive work experience of a professional counselor. Prerequisite: Candidacy in the M.A. Psychology Program. Cross-listed as PSYH 690.

Hours
3

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