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(F) A study of selected writings of the Hebrew Bible, Apocrypha, and New Testament with particular attention to the historica development of religious faith and practice in ancient Israel from earliest times to the rise of Christianity. The use and interpretation of Hebrew religious tradition in Islam is also examined. Students are introduced to various scholarly methods of biblical interpretation.

Hours
3

(S) An introduction to the academic study of religion through an examination of the relationship between religion and culture in the world's major religious traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Possible topics of focus include religious law and ethics, varieties of religious experience, and role of geography in the rise and spread of the major religions.

Hours
3

(F) Reading courses for Religious Studies majors and minors, taken in the junior year.

Hours
1

(S) Reading course for Religious Studies majors and minors, must be taken in the junior year.

Hours
1

(F) A study of the Christian religious tradition from the New Testament period until the Late Middle Ages, with particular attention to the interpretation of Jesus' life and teachings in social and cultural context. Prerequisite: RLGN 211 or 231, or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Prerequisites: RLGN211, or RLGN231
Hours
3

(S) A study of the Christian religious tradition in the modern period, with particular attention to issues in theology, ethics and hermeneutics. Prerequisite: RLGN 211 or 231, or permission of instructor. (Even Years Only).

Prerequisites: RLGN211, or RLGN231
Hours
3

(on demand) Theory and practice of Christian Education with special attention on planning a program in the local church. Prerequisite: RLGN 211 or 231, or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: RLGN211, or RLGN231
Hours
3

(S) A study of the medieval roots of the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, and the Catholic counter-reformation, and their contribution to the beginnings of the early modern period of European history. The principle focus is the complex relationship between Renaissance humanism and Reformation religious thought and the enduring social and cultural influence of the two movements on western civilization. Prerequisite: RLGN 211 or 231, or permission of instructor. The course may cross-list with HIST 451. (Odd Years Only).

Prerequisites: RLGN211, or RLGN231 Prohibited: HIST451
Hours
3

(F) A phenomenological and historical study of the varieties of religious practice in the United States. Prerequisite: RLGN 211 or 231, or permission of instructor. (Odd Years Only).

Prerequisites: RLGN211, or RLGN231
Hours
3

(F) The political and religious history of the Middle East from the beginnings of Islam to the beginning of the modern era. Particular attention is given to interaction with Greek and Christian civilizations. Same as HIST 461 (Even Years Only).

Prerequisites: RLGN211, or RLGN231 Prohibited: HIST461
Hours
3

(S) Intensive study of special topics in religion. Prerequisites: Advanced standing and permission of the instructor.

Hours
3

(F,S) Independent study or research on approved topics. May be repeated for credit.

Hours
2

(S) Intensive study of special topics in religion.

Hours
3

(on demand) This course is designed to provide students with experience and reflection during a mid-term break or during a semester project concerning the nature of community and social problems, and to prepare students for civic engagement and social responsibility. The course will include a supervised service-learning component through which students will develop skills and knowledge to meet community needs and better understand societal problems. (See Service Learning in the Academic Program section).

Hours
1

The interaction of individuals within a larger social context, in order to help students develop "sociological imagination" about their own lives. We examine how group life is organized and functions at both micro and macro levels. We look at the process of socialization as well as the various axes of inequality, including race, social class, and gender. We also look at a variety of social institutions including the family, education, health care, and religion.

Hours
3

An introduction to the study of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system. The course investigates the topics of juvenile law, theories of causation and procedureal issues, and their inter-relationships.

Hours
3

Uses the basic principles and concepts of sociology to study life in the Appalachian region. The areas of study include socio-economic class, culture, folklore, social institutions, the family, religion, schooling, poverty, and development.

Hours
3

Scientific understanding of social problems; problem areas in contemporary American society; and world-wide problems such as racism, sexism, problems in education, social stratification, problems in children's lives, environmental degradation, and violence.

Hours
3

How do we define family today? How is it structured: We examine key issues that have changed over the past thirty-fifty years, including dating and sexuality, single motherhood, teen pregnancy, divorce, stepfamilies, balancing work and family, and motherhood vs. fatherhood. Emphasis upon changing attitudes toward family relationships, some of the problems involved, and suggested solutions.

Hours
3

This course will provide an introduction to the methods and tools of qualitative analysis and writing. Course material will include training in qualitative research, emphasizing interviewing, oral history collection, and historiography. Students will also have the opportunity to examine ethical issues related to historical writing, research, and presentation of materials. In addition, the course will cover the basic skills needed to conduct historical research, including locating, using, and evaluating sources, and will explore how such work can shape and inform community development initiatives at the local level. Readings will be assigned regarding qualitative methods as well as community development. Students will also be trained in oral history collection. Each student will be required to collect at least one oral history for this course.

Hours
3

An examination of the interaction between sex and gender in contemporary U.S. society, with the focus on how society influences and constructs these two core concepts in both micro and macro realms. Prerequisites: SOCI 131 or upper division standing.

Prerequisites: SOCI131
Hours
3

A sociological examination of the origin and organization of minorities and their effect on society today, with particular emphasis on minorities in the United States. Prerequisites: SOCI 131 or upper division standing.

Prerequisites: SOCI131
Hours
3

An interdisciplinary approach will be used to analysis the social interaction that generates interdependence among the members of a small group. Particular emphasis will be given to theories and activities which focus on the properties and dynamics that are common to all small groups: structure, interaction, self identity, and common goals. Prerequisites: PSYH 200 or SOCI 131 or upper division standing.

Prerequisites: PSYH200, or SOCI131
Hours
3

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