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This course examines descriptive and inferential statistics with the emphasis on understanding fundamental concepts and applyng data-analytic techniques to psychological studies and mental health literature. Students will gain the knowledge necessary for conducting psychological research activities, reviewing the literature, and understanding statistical tests and data analysis.

Hours
3

This course is designed to address the diverse issues that are related to the recovery from addiction as an ongoing process involving physical, psychological, social, intellectual, spiritual and cultural aspects of the individual. Major themes of the course include the passages of recovery, relapse prevention principles, relapse warning signs, and the twelve-step approach to recovery. Using a holistic perspective, students will gain insight into basic recovery principles as they are related to the process and prevention of relapse.

Hours
3

The intention of this course is to expand knowledge of the principles of research design across the range of major psychological research strategies, including both qualitative and quantitative methods. It aims to develop understanding of the intrinsic strengths and weaknesses of diverse investigative strategies in psychological inquiry, facilitate educated and analytical appraisal of empirical social science literature, and afford basic knowledge of applying varois methodological strategies in research projects.

Hours
3

This course involves an examination of current issues related to the classification and diagnosis of abnormal behavior and psychological states. Dimensional, descriptive, and categorical approaches to classification are reviewed, with emphasis on the current forms of adult psychopathology found in the DSM. Topics include the symptomatology, etiology, developmental patterns, and treatment approaches to various diagnostic categories. Empirical findings, methodological concerns, and conceptual issues are discussed. Cross-listed as COUN 520.

Hours
3

Exploration of the physiological effects of chemical use on human biological systems and human development. Emphasizes identification and management of chemically induced crises situations, including issues in co-morbidity and prevention.

Hours
3

This course involves an examination of current issues related to the classification and diagnosis of abnormal behavior and psychological states. Dimensional, descriptive, and categorical approaches to classification are reviewed, with emphasis on the current forms of adult psychopathology found in the DSM. Topics include the symptomatology, etiology, developmental patterns, and treatment approaches to various diagnostic categories. Empirical findings, methodological concerns, and conceptual issues are discussed.

Hours
3

This course is a systematic survey of the major theories of personality. Personality theories from the psychoanalytic, behavioral, phenomenological-existential, trait-factor and social learning traditions are presented and contrasted. The fundamental assumptions, nature of development, and individual variability of personality are presented for each outlook. The application of personality research is discussed in a variety of areas such as the study of aggressoin, anxiety, altruism, and locus of control.

Hours
3

The major focus of this course is an exploration of how individuals learn, including specific learning theories and their relation to classroom teaching.

Hours
3

This course provides an in-depth examination of the biochemical, neuro-anatomical, and physiological bases of human and animal behaviors such as sensory-perception, motor function, language, learning, memory and emotion. Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in Physiological or Biological Psychology, Neuroscience, Neuroanatomy or Neurophysiology; or permission of the professor.

Hours
3

This course provides an intensive study of selected topics of interest within the discipline of psychology. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Hours
3

Intensive study of selected topics of interest within the discipline of psychology. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies.

Hours
3

This course introduces studies that provide an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation in a culturally diverse society. This course also provides an understanding of assessment in counseling through (1) an overview of basic counseling assessment concepts, (2) an understanding of test construction, (3) familiarity with instruments, and (4) an overview of test interpretation. It also provides a discussion of typical problems and approaches to individual and group testing in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest, and personality measurement. History, rationale, and ethical issues in the use of counseling assessment instruments are included.

Hours
3

This course provides an understanding of human behavior as a function of social and cultural factors. Social psychology topics covered include social influence theory, attitude formation and change, social cognition, interpersonal perception, obedience and conformity, altruism, aggression, and stereotyping. The influence of factors such as cultural, racial, gender, and age differences on clinical practice are discussed. Includes community psychology's contribution to prevention and interventions in the field.

Hours
3

This course introduces studies that provide an understanding of the nature and needs of persons at all developmental levels and in diverse cultural contexts. This course also provides a systematic study of human development emphasizing physical, personality, cognitive, moral, and psychosocial developmental theories and issues, with an emphasis on facilitating optimal development and wellness over the lifespan.

Hours
3

This course overviews key theoretical concepts in health psychology, the multidisciplinary field that integrates biomedical and psychological knowledge to address a range of factors influencing physical and mental health. Common conditions in which biopsychosocial factors contribute to the underlying pathophysiology, disease course, or the individual's capacity for coping will be discussed. Psychological theories and practices relating to health and illness are also explored.

Hours
3

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of career development as it impacts on individuals throughout the life span. Emphasis is placed on career and vocational choice theories, current approaches to career development planning and placement, and social and psychological factors in career decision-making. Formal and informal occupational classification systems are covered. A great deal of emphasis is placed on practical applications of career theory to school counseling, individual counseling, group guidance, job search and placement, and career adjustment.

Hours
3

This course examines theoretical approaches including major systems theories, strategies and techniques of family and relationship therapy. A survey of the development of family and relationship counseling and proponents of the field are studied. Issues of conflict and ethical considerations are examined. The impact of cultural and social forces upon the family system is explore

Hours
3

This course presents a rationale for moving to group procedure. It provides a basis for the understanding of group structure, group topology and group dynamics. It explores group processes.

Hours
3

This course is a conceptual and experiential introduction to group dynamics, group counseling approaches and models, issues of group leadership, and group facilitation skills. Consideration is given to the goals of group counseling, composition, phases, and research. Includes group counselor orientations and behaviors, appropriate selection criteria and methods, and methods of evaluation of effectiveness.

Hours
3

The course is meant to contribute to the graduate student’s knowledge required for obtaining a license as a clinical psychologist. It is focused on understanding the interplay between emotion, motivation, and cognition, and using it to help people improve their emotional self-regulation, motivation, cognitive restructuring, and behavioral adjustment.

Hours
3

This course provides the opportunity for counselors and clinicians to strengthen their multicultural awareness, knowledge, and skills in the competencies necessary to effectively evaluate and treat culturally and ethnically diverse clients. Students will be able to develop an awareness of the prevalent beliefs and attitudes of different cultures, and to develop skills useful for appropriate interactions with diverse individuals. In the course of these studies, it is hoped that students will also become more aware of their own cultural values and biases as they study prevalent beliefs and attitudes of different cultures and diverse groups.
Cross-listed as Coun 655-Multicultural and Diversity Issues. May not receive credit for both.

Hours
3

This course is intended for students enrolled in the graduate psychology program. The content of the course includes ethical standards and values for guiding the professional practice of persons working in the field of mental health. The emphasis will be on ethical principles, code of conduct, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

Hours
3

This course is a survey of the specific criteria required for proper diagnosing of mental disorders and proper treatment planning. Upon completion of the course, students will have the ability to make accurate provisional five axis diagnoses using DSM-IV-TR criteria and be competent in applying a variety of related treatment planning tasks such as case conceptualization, scope of practice, establishing viable, articulate treatment plans, and using treatment protocols. Cross-listed as COUN 665.

Hours
3

Covers the development, administration, scoring, and interpretation of the most commonly used intelligence and achievement tests in psychological assessment. It includes coverage of the various Wechsler Scales, Stanford-Binet, DAS, WIAT, Woodcock-Johnson Battery, various measures of adaptive behavior, and other related tests of interest. Test selection, report writing, and diversity issues in appropriate test usage are discussed also. Prerequisite: Candidacy in the MA Psychology Program.

Hours
3

The course examines and compares various methods of personality assessment of adolescents and adults, including standardized tests, behavioral analyses, and interview techniques. Students are given practical experience using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), and projective techniques, among other contemporary instruments. Prerequisite: Candidacy in the MA Psychology Program.

Hours
3

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