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A classroom teacher's guide for identifying, planning, implementing, and assessing reading difficulties within the regular classroom. Topics covered include collaboration, grouping, reading, standardized testing, informal/ongoing assessment, and direct instruction of skills. For classroom and collaborating teachers.

Hours
3

A supervised experience in a tutorial situation. Students will be responsible for testing, planning the instructional cycle, and writing a case study report. Enrollment is open only to those seeking the readng and writing endorsements.

Hours
3

This course explores the role of the teacher leader towards ensuring student achievement for all students in a global classroom environment. Candidates will develop a "toolbox" of skills and resources to address the individual learning needs of multiple student constituencies in the classroom including: English as a Second Language (ESL) students, students with documented exceptionanalities across the full spectrum of need (IEP's to students identified as Gifted and Talented (GF), students from variant socioeconomic backgrounds and cultures, and students of different genders and sexual orientations. Candidates will complete a clinical placement in a setting that offers exposure to an ethnic, cultural, or socioeconomic perspective different than their own and provide a reflection of their experience.

Hours
1

Designed for classroom teachers who assume the responsibility of supervising student teachers. Experiences deemed necessary for developing students into effective teachers are considered. Prerequisite: One year of teaching experience or consent of the instructor.

Hours
0

Remaining at the forefront of advancement in technology allows candidates to truly become assets to their schools and develop themselves as teacher leaders. This course engages candidates in current and immerging technologies in educational practices. Topics covered include the use of technology as a tool for communication, assessment, research, and classroom management. Particular emphasis will be placed on the use of software including Skype, Smartphone, use of social media including Facebook and YouTube in the classroom, and formative/summative assessment through texting.

Hours
3

This course explores the idea of "out of the box" thinking by candidates to cover KY Academic Core Content (KYACC) standards. Further, course objectives and assignments will focus on preparing students across all grade levels in the areas of career development, college readiness, and life skills. In particular, candidates will develop proficiencies needed to advance student achievement including: problem-solving and critical thinking skills, presentation skills, ability to work in groups or teams, work ethic behaviors, and writing skills. Particular emphasis will be placed on the use of vocational instruction as a means to cover KYACC standards and in preparing students for career development and/or college readiness needs.

Hours
3

This is the first of four seminars for students in the Alternative Education Program at Union College. Students will be oriented to the Alternative Certification Program and discuss relevant professional issues of the beginning teacher.

Hours
3

This seminar will discuss the variety of concerns related to being an educator in a diverse world.

Hours
1

This seminar course is an orientation to the internship experience. It includes miscellaneous topics relating to areas of teacher concerns, i.e., school law, pupil accounting, professional organizations, principles of classroom organization and management and human interaction skills.

Hours
1

This seminar course for students in Alternative Education is designed to help students understand the dynamics of interaction between students and teachers. Professional relationships between teachers, parents, and administrators are also investigated. Classroom management and discipline and how teachers establish positive control of the learning environment are particular concerns.

Hours
1

This course examines in-depth the transition of students from childhood to adolescent, including a study of the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual needs unique to the middle grade student; social, economic, and political forces impacting middle schools; implications for courses of study, learning environments, and teacher characteristics. This course promotes the application of what is known about this age group to models of effective teaching, learning, and schooling. An emphasis is also placed on roles of middle grades teachers in promoting the healthy development of young adolescents.

Hours
3

For persons working toward an endorsement in reading and writing, psychology majors, special educators, and other individuals interested in the neuropsychological processes involved in the acquisition and development of language skills. Emphasis will be placed on research that illuminates the way people learn to read, the interrelationship of motivation, and attention, and the origins of disability.

Hours
3

Examines advanced models and theories of reading, as well as the role and responsibilities of the reading specialist. For those seeking reading and writing endorsement.

Prerequisites: PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR, or EDUC520 and EDUC530
Hours
3

Required in all Rank I programs. Following prescribed guidelines, the student works on a problem of practical significance in the classroom, school, or school district and prepares a formal project report. A written project proposal is prepared during the first month of the course, and students are expected to complete course requirements by the end of the term in which they are registered. Regular consultation with the project supervisor is expected. Prerequisites: Completion of 12 semester hours toward Rank I certification, and permission of the instructor.

Hours
3

(F,S) (formerly EDUC 099) Focuses on the development of practical, critical, and analytical strategies for reading college-level materials. This course considers tone, purpose, and rhetorical structures. Placement is based on ACT scores and/or college assessments.

Hours
3

(S) An introduction to the theories, practices, and habits of literary and cultural criticism, with specific texts drawn from such traditional areas of inquiry as literature, film, and rhetoric and from such emerging areas as consumer culture and folktale. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and 102 or transfer equivalents. Recommended corequisite: HUMN 214.

Prerequisites: ENGL100 and ENGL102, or ENGL101 and ENGL102, or ENCO100 and ENCO112, or ENCO111 and ENCO112, or ENCO111 and ENGL102, or ENCO100 and ENGL102
Hours
3

(F) Students will learn the fundamentals of writing and speaking for print, broadcast, internet and emerging media, focusing on writing and speaking to inform, the editing process, and integration of visual and audio elements. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: ENCO102 and ENCO101, or ENGL101 and ENGL102, or ENCO111 and ENCO112
Hours
3

(on demand) Intensive individual work under supervision, in some phase of English, American, or world literature, communication, or composition not ohterwise covered in the curriculum. Prerequisite: Twenty four credit hours in ENCO/ENGL/COMM courses and permission of English department chair. May be repeated for credit.

Hours
2

(F) (Formerly ENCO 099) Students selected for ENGL 099 will develop the writing skills required in college. They will participate in class meetings, attend tutorials, and assemble a portfolio that will include a final writing sample of academic writing. The three hours credit for this transitional course count for fulltime status but not toward graduation requirements. Students selected for the course must complete ENGL 099 before taking other ENGL courses and are strongly recommended to complete it before taking other writing-intensive classes at Union College. Course fee: $35.

Hours
3

(F, S)(formerly ENCO 100) As part of the humanities core sequence, this course develops skills of writing (including use of documentation), speaking, and critical reading. Tutorials and writing groups are a required component of the course. Prerequisite: ENGL 099 or placement in ENGL 100. Corequisite: HIST 110. Course fee: $35.

Prohibited: ENGL101 and ENCO100 and ENCO101
Hours
3

(F, S)(Formerly ENCO 111) As part of the humanities core sequence, this course develops skills of writing (including use of documentation), speaking, and critical readng. Corerequisite: HIST 110.

Prohibited: ENCO100 and ENCO101 and ENGL100
Hours
3

Engl 101L proceeds in conjunction with Engl 101 for selected students. The class provides supplemental instruction in individual and small-group settings directed by a faculty member with teaching experience in Engl 101. Placement is based on ACT scores and/or college assessments. Students may also elect to take the course. Offered every semester.

Hours
1

(F, S)(Formerly ENCO 112) As part of the humanities sequence, this course examines major texts in Western literature from the ancient world through the Renaissance, with attention to non-western influences. Student papers and presentations focus on literature and art. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and HIST 110. Corequisite: HUMN 112.

Prerequisites: HIST110 and ENCO111, or ENCO100, or ENGL100, or ENGL101, or ENCO101 Prohibited: ENGL112
Hours
3

(S) (formerly ENCO 232) An interdisciplinary study of the literature(s) of Appalachia, focusing on the region's cultural richness and diversity, exploring such texts as novels, poems, films, and recorded song from the perspectives of literary critic and cultural historian. This course does not count toward the ENGL major. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and 102 or transfer equivalents. (Odd Years Only).

Prerequisites: ENGL101 and ENGL102, or ENGL100 and ENGL102, or ENCO100 and ENCO112, or ENCO111 and ENCO112, or ENCO111 and ENGL102, or ENCO100 and ENGL102
Hours
3

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